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Polls
 

Fall 2004 Texas Poll:

 Scripss Howard Texas Fall 2004 Poll

Would you favor or oppose a bill in the Texas Legislature that would allow people with cancer and other serious illnesses to use their own marijuana for medical purposes, as long as their physician approves?
Fall 2004 % (N=900)

DEMOGRAPHICS

 
 
Favor
Oppose
DK
TOTAL%
75
19
6
 
Age
     
18-29
81
17
2
30-39
79
17
4
40-49
70
24
6
50-59
76
17
7
60 and older
72
19
9
 
Race/Ethnicity
     
Hispanic
79
16
5
Anglo
74
20
6
Black
80
15
5
 
Political Party
     
Republican
67
25
8
Democrat
81
13
6
Independent
82
13
5
 
Gender
     
Male
75
20
5
Female
75
18
7
 
Region
     
East
62
31
17
West
71
23
6
South
77
20
3
north
70
22
8
Gulf
79
16
5
Central
83
9
8
 
Income
     
Less than $10,000
74
23
3
$10,001-$20,000
83
16
1
$20,001-$30,000
82
16
2
$30,001-$40,000
78
17
5
$40,001-$50,000
75
16
9
$50,001-$60,000
73
23
4
$60,001 and above
74
19
7
 
Education
     
Some High School
69
28
3
High School Grad
76
18
6
Some College
76
17
7
College Grad
75
21
4
Graduate Work
71
21
8
 
 

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Methodology and Quality Control

The Fall 2004 Texas Poll was conducted Oct. 11-28, 2004 by the Scripps Research Center in Abilene. The Poll surveyed 900 adult Texans by telephone in a random sample of active telephone exchanges statewide. Margin of error for the whole sample is ± 3.3 percentage points and slightly larger for subgroups.

Sampling
The Scripps Research Center purchases a random-digit-dialing sample from Survey Sampling, Inc. of Fairfield, Connecticut. Survey Sampling identifies working telephone exchanges throughout Texas, then systematically generates telephone numbers by four-digit randomization. In addition to these steps, Survey Sampling compares the random-digit numbers against the 9.2 million numbers in their database, eliminating any numbers that match and increasing the changes of reaching a residential number.

Data Collection
The data collection team included a field director who was in charge of monitoring of the sample, sample control, verifying interviews, scheduling of monitoring and providing feedback to interviewers and supervisors.

All interviewers received training and practice interviewing sessions before working on the project. The data collection team was familiarized with the overall study objectives, interviewing techniques and the survey instrument.

A monitoring team used a standardized evaluation instrument to randomly assess individual interviewing performance in the use of appropriate feedback, reading verbatim, proper speech and pronunciation, interviewing pace and general rapport with respondents.

For a printable version, click here.

The Houston Area Survey

The Houston Area Surveyis a systematic professional study of public attitudes and experiences among Harris County residents that has been conducted annually since 1982.

In 1995 and again in 2003, the survey respondents were asked this question:
"For each of these public issues, please tell me whether you're generally for it or against it. What about: Making marijuana legally available for medical purposes?"

In 1995, 53% of the respondents were "for it" and 42% were "against it," with 5% undecided.
In 2003, 62% of the respondents were "for it" and 32% were "against it," with 6% undecided.
www.houstonareasurvey.org

AUSTIN

June 6, 2002 KVUE TV, Austin ABC affiliate, conducted a poll of 500 central Texas residents. They asked the question “ Do you think doctors should be allowed to prescribe marijuana for medical purposes?” 70% said yes, 24% said no, and 6% said not sure.

AARP Poll: Seniors Support Medical Marijuana

By ELIZABETH WOLFE
.c The Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) - Nearly three-fourths of older Americans support legalizing marijuana for medical use, according to a poll done for the nation's largest
advocacy group for seniors.

More than half of those questioned said they believe marijuana has medical benefits, while a larger majority agreed the drug is addictive.

AARP, with 35 million members, says it has no political position on medical marijuana and that its local branches have not chosen sides in the scores of
state ballot initiatives on the issue in recent elections.

But with medical marijuana at the center of a Supreme Court case to be decided next year, and nearly a dozen states with medical marijuana laws on their books, AARP decided to study the issue.

``The use of medical marijuana applies to many older Americans who may benefit from cannabis,'' said Ed Dwyer, an editor at AARP The Magazine, which will discuss medical marijuana in its March/April issue appearing in late January.

Among the 1,706 adults polled in AARP's random telephone survey in November, opinions varied along regional and generational lines and among the 30 percent of respondents who said they have smoked pot. AARP members represented 37 percent of respondents.

Overall, 72 percent of respondents agreed ``adults should be allowed to legally use marijuana for medical purposes if a physician recommends it.'' Those in the Northeast (79 percent) and West (82 percent) were more receptive to the idea than in the Midwest (67 percent) and Southwest (65 percent). In Southern states, 70 percent agreed with the statement.

Though 69 percent of those age 70 and older said they support legal medical marijuana use, less than half agreed it has medical benefits. Seventy percent of respondents age 45-49 said they believe in the medical benefits of pot, as did 59 percent of those in the 50-69 age group.

And while 74 percent of all people surveyed said pot is addictive, older respondents were more likely to think so: 83 percent of those 70 and older, compared with 61 percent of those aged 45-49.

Generational lines also divided those who have smoked pot: Just 8 percent of those 70 and older admitted having lit up, compared with 58 percent of the 45-49 group, 37 percent of those between 50 and 59 and 15 percent of the 60-69 set.

National polls in recent years have found majority support for allowing the use of marijuana for medical purposes.

Last month, the Supreme Court heard arguments over whether federal agents can pursue sick people who use homegrown marijuana with their doctors' permission and their states' approval.

The Bush administration has argued that allowing medical marijuana in California would undermine federal drug control programs, and that pot grown for medical use could end up on the illegal market and cross state lines.

The AARP poll of adults age 45 and older was conducted Nov. 10-21 by International Communications Research of Media, Pa. The margin of sampling error was plus or minus 2.5 percentage points.

 

Texas Nurses Association Poll:

The Texas Nurses Association polled its membership and on 1/28/05 the TNA Board of Directors endorsed the following statement:
"Licensed health care providers should not be punished for recommending the medical use of marijuana to seriously ill people, and seriously ill people should not be subjected to criminal sanctions for using medical marijuana if their health care provider has told the patient that such use is likely to be beneficial."

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